Eugene Climate Plan 2010 May Draft

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This working page is part of the Eugene Climate Planning project, an independent public interest consulting project intended to provide background technical analysis in support of the official Eugene Climate and Energy Action Plan (CEAP) project.

Eugene Climate Planning

This page of analysis is based on the May 2010 draft of the Eugene Climate and Energy Action Plan (CEAP), http://www.sustaineugene.com/eugeneclimate/?page_id=468.

It also draws on the Eugene Climate Plan 2010 Mock-Up, previously sketched to support parallel analysis while awaiting the draft CEAP, as well as the Portland Climate Action Plan and various other references.

Contents

Eugene May 2010 Draft Plan Carbon Budget

Because the Eugene May 2010 Draft CEAP does not include an overall carbon budget, or even a basic overall GHG emissions reductions target, this analysis is constructed from broadly accepted mainstream numbers, using a minimum of assumptions. The carbon budget starts with the official City of Eugene greenhouse gas emissions inventory of 2007, and factors in official population projections, presenting levels that meet the State of Oregon adopted emissions reduction targets for consideration relative to components of the Eugene CEAP.

Despite the lack of a quantitative goal in the May 2010 draft Eugene CEAP, this may help with understanding its implications by providing a concrete reference projection of mainstream climate planning targets. This carbon budget may also help illuminate the linear implications of basic facts and choices already made and acknowledged by state and local elected adipex officials.

Summary of Eugene Draft Plan - Carbon Budget

Expanded technical version of projected carbon budget

Eugene GHG Emission Budget 1990 2005 2020 Relative to 1990 (10% GHG reduction) 2030 (Eugene target needed to meet state adopted goals) 2030 relative to 1990 (32% GHG reduction) 2030 relative to 2005 ~peak (50% below 1990) 2050 Relative to 1990 (75% GHG reduction)
Total carbon emissions (metric tons) 911,965 1,258,524 820,769 90 % 623,176 68% 50% 227,991 25 %
Population (official projections) 112,733 146,160 175,515 156 % 211,319 (adj. from 2031) 187% 145% 383,135 (?) 340 %
Per person carbon emissions (metric tons) 8.1 8.6 4.7 58 % 2.9 36% 34% 0.6 7 %
Passenger (vehicle, only) miles/day/person (* LCOG simulated) (Needed savings allocated 50/50 to technology/VMT) 17.6 15.2 * 10.8 61 % 8.3 47% 54% 3.2 18 %
Electricity (kWh per person) 17,072 15,656 9,869 58 % 6224 36% 40% 1,256 7 %
Natural gas (Therms per person) 440 564 254 58 % 160 36% 28% 32 7 %

source: Eugene Community Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Report, July 2007, p3, 22, 2050 population: Population Projections for 2004 Wastewater Facilities Plan

Comparison of Eugene May 2010 Draft Plan GHG Reduction Targets

2020 Target Total Eugene GHG emissions tonnes/yr  % Change in per capita GHG from BAU Per capita CO2 tonnes/yr
Business as usual (BAU) 1,528,199 = 8.8
Eugene May 2010 Draft no 2020 target in draft no 2020 target in draft no 2020 target in draft
Meet 1990 Levels 911,964 - 40 % 5.2
Kyoto Protocol (7% < 1990) 848,127 - 45 % 4.9
Oregon Adopted (HB 3543, 10% < 1990) 820,768 - 46 % 4.7

sources: Eugene Community Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Report, July 2007, p14, Oregon House Bill 3543: Global Warming Actions

Eugene May 2010 Draft Climate Plan Actions

Sector 1 - Buildings and Energy 2030 Objectives

Objective I (O-1): Reduce total green house gas emissions from existing buildings by 25% by 2030

Adjust to - Reduce total green house gas emissions from existing buildings by 40% through 2030.

Critique of O-1
The objective is qualitatively very appropriate, but quantitatively inadequate, considering three levels of analysis.

First, using ECLA inventory numbers of current housing stock and additional dwellings to be added by 2031 as a basis for proportional projection, it appears to be impossible to reach the 2030 energy use reductions needed unless existing buildings in total reduce their energy consumption by about 40%. If existing building energy consumption is reduced by 40% (to 60% of ~2005 average level) and the overall average of new building energy consumption reaches an 80% reduction (to 20% of ~2005 average level) the result will be close to the required energy reduction level.

Second, while these alternative reductions goals may seem impressive, they are known to be technologically feasible, unlike many other GHG emissions reductions actions. Buildings constructed to the PassivHaus standard, of which some 15,000 have already been built in Germany, operate with around 10% of the energy consumption of current US average buildings. Implementing toward PassivHaus-level 90% savings over the course of twenty years would give us time to improve rapidly on current best practices and achieve 40%/80% existing/new on the overall period.

Third, a couple of important complicating factors call out for second-order analysis, but are likely to very roughly cancel each other, leaving 40%/80% as appropriate conservation levels to aim for given currently available information. (Expand on: cleaner energy possibility, versus need to be able to continue glide path out to 2050 target. These projections weight loss pills may also be refined by incorporating redevelopment percentages.)

Actions

  • 1 (1.1). Identify the most cost-effective opportunities for increasing efficiency in existing buildings.
  • 2 (1.2). Expand assistance programs for retrofits that increase energy efficiency and reduce the carbon footprint of existing buildings.
  • 3 (1.3). Establish a project fund to expand financing mechanisms for residential energy efficiency and/ or renewable energy system x installations.
  • 4 (1.4). Target occupant behavior in order to reduce energy use in all types of buildings.
  • 5 (1.5). Adopt an Energy Performance Score program for existing and new buildings to help buyers and renters to better understand the energy use of a building before they purchase or occupy it.

Critique

The listed actions are almost certainly inadequate to meet the draft objective, and they are entirely inadequate to meet an adjusted state-target-compliant objective. None of the objectives appears to be counterproductive.
Actions like "Identify..." have no net impact on greenhouse gas emissions. "Identify..." can be an important first step toward an action with actual net impact, but as a standalone, it means, well, nothing. It's a pre-action, not an action.

Proposed additional action

  • Develop a strict code requirement for energy efficiency retrofits of existing buildings, sufficient to meet the objective of 40% overall reduction in energy use by 2030, and implement it by 2012, supported by the other actions under this objective.

Objective II (O-2): Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new construction 50% by 2030

Adjust to - Reduce total green house gas emissions from new construction by 80% through 2030.

Critique of O-2
See discussion under Objective 1 immediately above. If existing building energy consumption is reduced by 40% (to 60% of ~2005 average level) and the overall average of new building energy consumption reaches an 80% reduction (to 20% of ~2005 average level) the result will be close to the required building energy use reduction level.

Actions

  • 6 (2.6) . Lobby for adoption, and actively participate in development, of building code amendments that meet the Architecture 2030 standards for energy efficiency.
  • 7 (2.7). Increase incentives for highly energy-efficient new buildings, aiming toward zero net energy and carbon neutral buildings.
  • 8 (2.8). Develop incentives to encourage the use of passive heating and cooling systems and other strategies that reduce energy * demand and better adapt buildings for a changing climate.
  • 9 (2.9). Increase incentives to encourage smaller homes that use less energy to operate and fewer building materials to construct.

Critique

The listed actions are almost certainly inadequate to meet the draft objective, and they are entirely inadequate to meet an adjusted state-target-compliant objective. None of the objectives appears to be counterproductive, although there is too much emphasis on incentives across several of the actions, without demonstration of a viable funding source for those incentives. This climate action plan needs to be capable of successful implementation in a context of resource scarcity.
Actions like "Lobby for... and develop..." have no net impact on greenhouse gas emissions. "Lobby for... and develop..." can be important early steps toward an action with actual net impact, but in and of themselves, they mean, well, nothing. They are pre-actions, not enough to create an effective action by themselves.

Proposed additional action

  • Develop a strict code requirement for energy efficiency of new buildings, sufficient to meet the objective of 80% overall energy reduction by 2030, and implement it by 2012, supported by the other actions under this objective.

Objective III (O-3): Expand Development of Renewable and District Energy Systems.

Adjust to - Expand Development of Renewable and Highly-Efficent Energy Systems.

Critique of O-3

A good objective, with a couple of additional needs. First, how much? Second, why single out district energy systems among various other high-efficiency approaches? For instance, when buildings become extremely efficient, the costs of energy distribution loom large, and district systems may no longer make sense. Don't try to pick particular winners - define the level of need, and a systematic strategy for how to meet it.

Actions

  • 10 (3.10). Increase the use of on-site renewable energy systems, such as solar hot water, photovoltaic, and ground-source heat pumps, by removing barriers (e.g. financial, infrastructural, regulatory, and perception) to such systems.
  • a. Invest in EWEB’s downtown network to facilitate net metering, a program which would allow connection to photovoltaic systems on downtown buildings. Any surplus energy generated by the systems would flow back into EWEB’s electricity grid.
  • b. Address the financial barriers to onsite renewable energy by expanding financing options such as long-term loans and property-assessed clean energy bonds.
  • c. Dispel the myth that solar energy isn’t viable in Western Oregon.
  • 11 (3.11). Develop at least one community renewable-energy pilot project by 2015.
  • 12 (3.12). Develop at least one clean district energy, or shared energy, system pilot project by 2015.

Critique

The draft objective has no measurable intent, stated as it is in non-specific, open-ended terms. The draft actions are vague, largely symbolic, and entirely inadequate to meet any likely state-target-compliant GHG reductions objective. None of the objectives appears to be counterproductive, although there is too much emphasis on the one particular approach of district energy systems.
Actions like "Dispel the myth that... " have no net impact on greenhouse gas emissions. "Dispel the myth that... " can be a vaulable prelude to an action with actual net impact, but in and of itself, it means, well, nothing. It is a cultural pre-action, not enough to create an effective techncial impact by itself.

Proposed additional action

  • Develop a target for expansion of renewable and highly-efficent energy systems, considering both centralized and distributed options, sufficient to meet the state-adopted GHG emissions reductions targets interpolated to 2030, and by 2012, implement strategies appropriate to meeting the 2030 target, supported by the other actions under this objective.

Objective IV (O-4): Increase the implementation of climate change preparation strategies for the built environment.

Actions

  • 13 (4.13). Lobby for state building code amendments that facilitate passive design strategies in addition to mechanical solutions to climate control, water delivery, and energy consumption and incorporate climate change preparation strategies into building design and construction. For example: optimizing day lighting, limiting the area of east and west –facing windows, incorporating exterior shading devices above windows, including reflecting roofing, and using landscaping to control heat gain and minimize cooling requirements.

project by 2015.

  • 14 (4.14). Provide education, assistance and incentives to reduce consumption of potable water in new and existing buildings and landscaping. For example, encourage the use of low-flow fixtures, appropriate (e.g. xeriscape) landscaping approaches, greywater systems, and onsite rainwater catchment systems.

Critique

The objective is good conceptually. There seems to be no groundwork provided for the strong assertion that "it is imperative that state building codes be changed to facilitate climate preparation strategies." (page 13). That leaves Action 13 without much foundation.
Action 13 would be better cast in terms of performance objectives, rather than a list of prescriptive design options some of which may or may not remain appropriate on different sites and with changing technologies. Consider opportunities for local action, which can the community can take more direct responsibility for, in addition to (or in the context of Eugene's own plan, even instead of) just supporting positive change at a broader level.
The two proposed actions do not seem sufficient or complete in terms of providing a comprehensive built environment cliamte change adaption strategy.

Proposed additional action

  • Develop a comprehensive inventory of probable and potential local and regional environmental changes due to global warming. For each significant impact, determine appropriate adaptation tactics, and by 2014, considering the relative risk assessment of potential impacts, implement strategies appropriate to increase the robustness of Eugene's building stock, so it can maintain appropriate functional performance in the face of likely environmental change.

Sector 2 - Food and Agriculture 2030 Objectives

Objective I (O-5): Reduce consumption of carbon-intensive foods.

Actions

  • 1 (5.1). Begin a community campaign to educate the public about food choice as part of a climate-friendly lifestyle.
a. Specifically encourage reduced consumption of carbon-intensive foods including red meat and dairy products. Partner with local food advocacy organizations, OSU extension, local restaurants, and food wholesalers.
  • 2 (5.2). Implement a “Buy climate-friendly first” food purchasing policy for public institutions including city and county governments, schools, and hospitals.

Objective II (O-6): Reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with agriculture and food waste.

Actions

  • 3 (6.3). Transition to agricultural methods that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Support efforts of Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon State University, Willamette Farm and Food Coalition, and other partners.
  • 4 (6.4). Create a local waste digester that can capture methane from food wastes and other organic materials that are currently being dumped in landfills. (See Consumption and Waste section for details.)

Objective III (O-7): Preserve the productive capacity of the local and regional foodsheds..

Actions

  • 5 (7.5). Strengthen current land use regulations which protect farm lands, particularly those on high-value agricultural soils.
a. Strengthen City and County land use protections to prevent urban growth onto prime farmlands.
  • 6 (7.6). Strengthen current farmland protections at state levels
a. Lobby state agencies to strengthen protections for high-value farmlands

Objective IV (O-8): Prepare our food systems for the uncertainties created by climate change and rising energy prices.

Actions

  • 7 (8.7). Implement the following recommendations from Eugene’s Food Security Scoping and Resource Plan4
a. Identify a City of Eugene liaison for food-system related programming
b. Develop a comprehensive Community Food Security Assessment and implement changes to improve food security.
  • 8 (8.8). Develop an updated regional emergency food distribution plan that accounts for climate- and energy-based disruptions. (This action is also addressed through the “vulnerability assessment” outlined in the Health and Social Services section).
  • 9 (8.9). Increase the diversity and drought resistance of food crops grown in the upper Willamette Valley.
a. Support the efforts of food-advocacy organizations, foodgrowers, and Oregon State University to develop appropriate crops.
b. Prioritize development of vegetable protein crops such as beans and legumes which are suited to the Willamette Valley.
  • 10 (8.10). Remove impediments to using greywater in agriculture. Work with state lawmakers to find solutions for greywater re-use.

Objective V (O-9): Increase availability of home-grown, and locally-sourced food in Eugene.

Actions

  • 11 (9.11). Expand community gardens on public and private lands including school campuses, City lands, and church properties.
a. Assess opportunities for community garden locations within the city.
  • 12 (9.12). Encourage planting of food-bearing trees and shrubs on public and private lands. Support urban tree food programs of such advocates as Tree by Tree, and the Eugene Tree Foundation.
  • 13 (9.13). Reevaluate limitations on numbers and types of animals permitted under Eugene’s code to allow, where appropriate, an increase in the number and variety of food- producing animals that can be kept by urban residents.

Sector 3 - Land Use and Transportation 2030 Objectives

Critique of Sector 3 - Land Use and Transportation
This is a primary sector where City policies can have real effect, and conversely, where needed GHG reductions are not likely to be achieved without real City leadership and effective policies. Furthermore, other major current community planning efforts such as Envision Eugene and TransPlan are looking to the CEAP for benchmark guidance.
Thus, it is essential that CEAP establish not just a smattering of good ideas in this area, but a real comprehensive set of sector benchmarks.
The backbone of land use and transportation GHG emissions reductions is VM reduction. VMT reduction can hardly be considered a radical proposal, as it has been an established cornerstone of the Oregon land use planning system for decades. VMT reduction targets realistically sufficient to meet state-adopted reductions goals must be part of CEAP.
Since VMT does not seem to be directly addressed anywhere in the May 2010 CAP draft, it would seem this requires one or more additional objectives.in this sector.

New LU-T Objective I (O-x): Collaboratively revise long-term land use and transportation plans, including the Metro Plan, TransPlan, and the RTP, to achieve a 50% reduction in per capita vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by 2030.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-x

Objective I (O-10): Create 20-minute neighborhoods, where 90% of Eugene residents can safely walk or bicycle to meet most basic daily, non-work needs, and also have safe pedestrian and bicycle routes which connect to mass transit.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-10
The definition here could use substantial clarification. What is the radius of a 20 minute neighborhood - is it 20 minutes walking, or 20 minutes cycling? While the term is nice for friendly branding, it should probably be reduced to a specific distance, even if only provisional until developed in more detail, for clarity in the climate plan. Actions

  • 1 (10.1). Make the creation of 20-minute neighborhoods a core component of the Eugene Plan and the Eugene Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan.
  • 2 (10.2). By 2013, complete and implement a 20-minute neighborhoods plan:
a. Identify funding for necessary planning effort.
b. Identify key accessibility components for 20-minute neighborhoods, e.g. schools, parks, grocery store, retail services, etc.
c. Conduct a network gap analysis to determine needs.
d. Coordinate with opportunity siting and infill compatibility standards planning.

Critique

Objective II (O-11): Increase density around the urban core and along transit corridors.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-11
For this to be a meaningful goal, there should be more clarity about what 'the urban core" means, and there needs to be a concrete project to develop and define long-term committed transit corridors. This needs to be done in a broad collaboration including the general community, LTD, and Lane County, at least. Actions

  • 3 (11.3). Zone future commercial and high- density residential uses in and around the urban core, and along EmX and other high-capacity transit corridors to accommodate future urban growth.
a. Coordinate with opportunity siting and infill compatibility standards planning efforts.

Critique

Internal political correctness aside, it is not clear that the Opportunity Siting project has a lot to contribute to significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions. ICS is not currently an active project, and the work approved under that effort to date has been very limited in terms of community-wide effect. For substantial climate planning, we need to define real and ultimately measurable goals in these areas - not just reference other recent or current work which may have already fallen short of the mark. CEAP needs to get the mark at the right place, to help spur and inspire appropriate new work.

Objective III (O-12): Consider the potential for climate refugees when doing land use planning.

Adjust to -

Actions

  • 4 (12.4). Closely monitor the community’s population growth rate to gauge whether population projections are accurate.
a. Setpopulationthresholdsthatwouldtriggerreviewofplans.Forexampleif growth rates are higher than 10% of projections for two years in a row.
b. If trends show a significantly higher rate of population increase than was assumed in the planning process, Eugene may need to update its planning model sooner than legally required.

Critique

Objective IV (O-13): Continue to expand and improve Eugene’s bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and connectivity to increase the percentage of trips made by bike and on foot.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-13

Actions

  • 5 (13.5). Create a pedestrian and bicycle master plan that will:
a. Identifymobilitygapsinthebicycleandpedestriantransportationsystem.
b. Recommend improvements to increase safety (both real and perceived), comfort, speed, and convenience for users of all ages and skill levels.
c. Create a plan for implementing the necessary system improvements.
d. Identify funding sources for implementation.
  • 6 (13.6). Increase the mileage and connectivity of bicycle boulevards and shared-use paths to encourage cyclists of various skill levels to commute by bike.
  • 7 (13.7). Create a “Complete Streets” policy that requires all new transportation projects and rehabilitation projects to incorporate infrastructure for bicycles, pedestrians, and mass transit service.

Critique

Objective V (O-14): Increase the supply of frequent, reliable, integrated and convenient public transit.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-14

Actions

  • 8 (14.8). Diversify funding sources for Lane Transit District (LTD) to increase the long-term reliability of mass transit service.

a. Partner with Springfield, Lane County, LTD, and businesses to develop strategies for providing mass transit for the Eugene community.

  • 9 (14.9). Align City of Eugene Transportation System Plan and LTD long-range transit plan to integrate bus routes into the broader alternative transportation system.
a. Partner with LTD to help inform service changes and improvements.
b. Create special setbacks along future Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) or other mass transit corridors to accommodate future right-of-way expansion.
c. Work with LTD in developing the Long Range Transit Plan to determine the role of mass transit in accomplishing greenhouse gas emission reduction goals.
  • 10 (14.10). Invest in transit infrastructure that meets future access and mobility needs while consuming less fossil fuel. Recommended actions include:
a. Maximize electrification of the regional transportation systems.
b. Increase use of hybrid vehicles, including buses and other heavy vehicles.

Critique

Objective VI (O-15): Expand outreach, marketing and education about climate-friendly transportation alternatives.

Adjust to -

Critique of O-15

Actions

  • 11. Increase promotion of bicycling, walking, mass transit, car-pooling, telecommuting, high-occupancy vehicles, and emergency ride home programs as attractive alternatives to driving, in order to increase the mode share of alternatives to the single-occupant vehicle. Partner with Point 2 Point Solutions, Lane Transit District, Greater Eugene Area RiderS (GEARS), BikeLane Coalition, local businesses, the City of Eugene’s Smart Trips program, Safe Routes to School, Lane Coalition for Healthy Active Youth, Lane County Public Health, Climate Masters at home(TM), and others.
  • 12. Increase the community’s understanding of fuel-efficient driving techniques.

Critique

Objective VII (O-16): Ensure maximum efficiency in current and future freight systems.

Adjust to -

Actions

  • 13 (16.13). Plan for efficient freight transportation that minimizes greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel consumption, and:
a. Connects multiple modes (train, truck, van, car, bicycle);
b. Accommodates regional (upper Willamette Valley) commercial, industrial and agricultural freight needs; and
c. Facilitates efficient local deliveries.

Critique

Objective VIII (O-17): Increase the use of low-carbon vehicles and fuels to improve overall fuel-efficiency and reduce vulnerability to fluctuating oil prices.

Adjust to -

Actions

  • 14 (17.14). Accelerate the transition to plug-in hybrids and electric vehicles. Partner with Lane County, EWEB, auto retailers, electrical contractors, UO, LCC, and others
a. Support the installation of a network of electric car charging stations.
b. Require installation of electric car charging stations in new multifamily housing.
c. Use guidance provided by the University of Oregon Electric Vehicle strategy.
  • 15 (17.15). Conduct research to understand what role biofuels can play in decreasing Eugene's vulnerability to energy markets. Work with partners at LTD, the Oregon Department of Energy, etc.
a. Complete research by 2013 so that outcomes can inform the next CEAP.

Critique

Sector 4 - Consumption and Waste 2030 Objectives

Objective I (O-18): Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing consumption of goods.

Actions

  • 1 (18.1). Educate businesses and residents about the important role of consumption in producing greenhouse gas emissions.
a. Partner with organizations including BRING Recycling, NextStepRecycling, Lane County Waste Management, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, private sector businesses, neighborhood associations, and others, to encourage businesses and residents to:
i. purchase durable, repairable and reusable goods
ii. reduce the amount of materials that go to waste, including food
iii. reduce consumption of carbon-intensive consumer goods and services.
  • 2 (18.2). Lobby at the state level for better product labeling that includes information about the greenhouse gas emissions associated with products.
  • 3 (18.3). Provide information for the public on when to replace high energy-use appliances. Where/If this information is already available, increase its distribution and accessibility. Partner with EWEB and other local utilities.
  • 4 (18.4). Actively advocate for the development of local, state, and federal product legislation that results in design changes.

Objective II (O-19): Increase waste diversion by improving recycling and composting.

Actions

  • 5 (19.5). Target expanded recycling outreach and services to commercial and multi-family residential buildings, including local businesses, apartment buildings, and student and cooperative housing.
  • 6 (19.6). Enact a local ordinance to increase waste recovery rates from commercial and multi- family buildings.
  • 7 (19.7). Assist businesses in improving paper, metal and glass recycling with a goal of supporting 5% of the community’s businesses each year. Aid partners by promoting events or trainings, providing space for trainings, assist with funding, etc. Partner with Chamber of Commerce, BRING Recycling, Re:Think Business, LCC Climate Masters at WorkTM and others.
  • 8 (19.8). Enact an ordinance that requires all construction and demolition waste materials to be sorted for reusable or recyclable materials. Partner with Lane County Solid Waste.

Objective III (O-20): Increase the diversion rate for organic wastes

Actions

  • 9 (20.9). Conduct a pilot project at the River Avenue Waste Water Treatment Plant to determine the system ability for co-digestion of food waste and biosolids.

Objective IV (O-21): Conduct research to determine the most effective next steps in the area of consumption and waste.

Actions

  • 10 (21.10). Follow research being conducted by the EPA’s West Coast Forum on Climate Change, Waste Prevention, Recovery and Disposal3, to determine highest priority and most cost effective measures to address GHG production in the materials management sector.
  • 11 (21.11). Conduct study to determine the efficiency of maintaining a multiple-hauler garbage collection system as regards greenhouse gas emissions. Use the outcome of the research to inform the next Community Climate and Energy Action Plan.

Objective V (O-22): Reduce greenhouse gases in municipal operations by changing purchasing practices and reducing waste.

Actions

  • 12 (22.12). By 2012, improve the procurement policies of public agencies to require:
a. Reuseproductsandmaterialswheneverpossible,and b. Avoid disposable, and purchase durable, goods whenever possible
  • 13 (22.13). The City of Eugene purchasing policies currently reflect the priorities above.
a. Settargetsfortheseprocurementpolicies
b. Identify measurements to monitor the impacts of these procurement policies
c. Increase efforts to implement these purchasing policies throughout the organization
  • 14 (22.14). Reduce public agency purchase of greenhouse gas-intensive goods by 2014:
a. IdentifyCity-purchasedgoodswiththehighestassociatedgreenhousegas emissions by 2012.
b. Create a plan to reduce the purchase of the 5 most greenhouse gas intensive goods.
c. Annually report the quantity of these goods being purchased.
  • 15 (22.15). Implement the steps outlined in the City waste reduction plan to reduce waste at City buildings, events, and ongoing operations.

Sector 5 - Health and Social Services 2030 Objectives

Objective I (O-23): Prepare community systems for longer-term climate and energy challenges including fuel shortages, increased summer drought and increased storm intensity.

Actions

  • 1 (23.1). Conduct a climate and energy vulnerability assessment that addresses the mid- term, and longer-term climate and energy vulnerabilities of the community – specifically regarding: energy, water, food, health, shelter, and sanitation. Partner with EWEB, Springfield, Lane County, the University of Oregon, the Red Cross, the National Guard, social services agencies, and medical professionals.

a) Build on existing emergency management efforts. b) Identify local solutions and estimate costs of reducing the vulnerabilities. c) Estimate capacity needs and costs for implementing preparation and adaptation strategies. d) Continue to monitor emerging data on climate-change-related health risks and revise adaptation plans as necessary.

  • 2 (23.2). Strengthen current hunger relief systems to handle increased short-term and long-term demand.

a) Work with the local food bank to develop plans to prepare for increased food demand from a higher percentage of the population. b) Remove barriers to, and encourage, development of home-grown food sources such as backyard and community gardens, urban food orchards, etc. This action item is also identified in Food and Agriculture section.

  • 3 (23.3). Expand energy assistance programs: Work with local utilities to increase financial assistance so that marginalized populations can maintain utility service, thereby preventing health or infrastructure problems that can occur when water, gas or electricity are shut off.

a) Target rental properties and property managers.

  • 4 (23.4). Conduct a food security assessment, as outlined in the Food and Agriculture section, and take action to increase the security of the community’s food supply.

Objective II (O-24): Reduce the exposure of human populations to climate-related disasters.

Actions

  • 5 (24.5). Reduce risk of home fires due to wildfires in and around the urban area.
a. Increase efforts to educate homeowners about creating defensible space around their homes
  • 6 (24.6). Ensure essential services are not located within the 100 year flood zone
a. Identify essential emergency and non-emergency services which are located in flood zones or which could be isolated by flooding
b. Develop a plan to move essential services out of the flood zone and/or decrease their vulnerability to flood damage and flood isolation.

Objective III (O-25): Increase the capacity of Eugene's health sector, and the community at large, to meet the health-related challenges of climate change and rising fuel prices by fostering greater public health system involvement in climate change and energy planning.

Actions

  • 7 (25.7). Assist local health agencies in educating employees and the public about the health risks posed by climate change.
a. Prioritize local public health resources to emphasize educating the public, staff, and administration about climate change, energy price volatility and the related system impacts and health risks.
b. Pursue funding for development of a climate change preparation strategy for the public health system.

Sector 6 - Urban Natural Resources 2030 Objectives

Objective I (O-26): Manage urban natural resources for multiple benefits

Actions

  • 1 (26.1). Protect sensitive natural resource areas:
a. Include urban riparian areas, wetlands and floodplains, and other areas that improve resilience and that clean stormwater, cool streams, reduce air temperatures, clean the air, and reduce the impacts of flooding.
  • 2 (26.2). Increase funding for public acquisitions of property to facilitate the combined goals of stormwater management, flood abatement, stream shading, headwaters protection, and increased connectivity between wildlife corridors. Many of these priorities are outlined in the Ridgeline Vision and Action Plan, the Willamette Vision Plan, and the Metro Waterways Plan
  • 3 (26.3). Update urban forestry management plans to promote urban forest management on a city-wide scale, expanding beyond individual lots or streets.
  • 4 (26.4). Identify and remove barriers that may discourage or prevent use of Low Impact Development (LID) practices during construction.

Objective II (O-27): Manage and update urban natural resource information to reflect current knowledge. Make data available to public and policy-makers.

Actions

  • 5 (27.5). Compile and maintain an inventory of urban natural resources that is current and accessible to the public and policy-makers.
a. Create a list of climate-sensitive urban natural resources that should be tracked, such as: inventories of City-managed trees, stormwater resources, riparian buffers, opportunities for food production, solar resources, soil classifications, publicly-owned land, etc.
b. Identify a central coordinator of information, such as Lane Council Of Governments (LCOG).
c. Utilize existing inventories wherever possible
d. By 2013, identify any information gaps and create a plan to fill those gaps.
e. Fill any information gaps by 2015.

Objective III (O-28): Update vegetation management plans to prepare for changes in climate

Actions

  • 6 (28.6). Plan for increased fires in the forests surrounding the urban area.
a. Re-examine urban forest management policies to ensure that focus is placed on reducing susceptibility to the likely increase in wildfires brought about by climate change.

Objective IV (O-29): Educate community members about the importance of urban natural resources

Actions

  • 7 (29.7). Provide educational resources to students, teachers, residents, and businesses about the benefits of trees, watershed health, and water quality.
a. Build on existing community efforts
b. Partner with government agencies, non-profits, and businesses including arborists, landscapers, landscape architects, designers, and architects.

Objective V (O-30): Manage rainfall (stormwater) to reduce flooding, recharge groundwater, and improve water quality.

Actions

  • 8 (30.8). Manage stormwater and riparian areas to meet multiple goals: improved water quality, lowered stream temperatures, increased infiltration, increased capacity, and improved plant and wildlife habitat.
  • 9 (30.9). Develop a program to encourage onsite treatment of stormwater from existing buildings and facilities.
a. Consider using the reduction of stormwater fees to encourage property owners to retrofit existing structures and facilities.

Objective VI (O-31): Expand public and private programs to manage, and invest in, trees to cool buildings, pavement, and waterways.

Actions

  • 10 (31.10). Increase planting, preservation, and maintenance of trees and shrubs.
a. Build on existing initiatives and partnerships.
b. Seek additional financial and volunteer resources.
c. Plant a diversity of species to increase the percentage of survivors under changing future conditions.
  • 11 (31.11). Control invasive species, such as English ivy, on public lands including City and County parks in order to maintain the health of existing urban area habitats.
  • 12 (31.12). Create incentives to encourage residents and businesses to plant trees.

Objective VII (O-32): Encourage ongoing water conservation.

Actions

  • 13 (32.13). Increase existing water conservation education and water quality initiatives as mentioned in the Buildings and Energy section.

Objective VIII (O-33): Strengthen protections of potable water sources.

Actions

  • 14 (33.14). Strengthen and expand water quality protections to protect surface water quality and prevent the contamination of shallow wells.

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